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GMO Crops Are Destroying Farmland, And Monsanto Doesn’t Want You to Know

GMO Crops Are Destroying Farmland, And Monsanto Doesn’t Want You to Know

GMO Crops Are Destroying Farmland, And Monsanto Doesn’t Want You to Know

by Christina Sarich

The European Association for bio-industries, EuropaBio, wants you to believe that “GM crops can protect soils from erosion through less ploughing, conserving soil moisture, too. GM herbicide tolerant crops reduce the need to plough fields in preparation for planting crops. This saves fuel because less tilling is necessary. GM insect resistant crops require less treatments with insecticides, which also decreases the need for tractor use.” But these statements are completely false.
GMO Crops Are Destroying Farmland

Image credit: Pixabay

This is essentially the requisite lie told by all of biotech – including:

  • Monsanto –Known for creating orhelping to create 13 highly carcinogenic and toxic products includingsaccharin,PCBs, Polystyrene, DDT, the atom bomb, nuclear weapons, dioxin, Agent Orange, Petroleum based fertilizers, Round Up, rGBH, aspartame, GMOs, and terminator seeds. Monsanto sues everyone to keep dealing their dirty products, but the most recent suit, involving Dustin Barca, a surfer-turned mixed martial arts fighter in Hawaii is of special note. He is taking it personally that Monsanto poisons him, andbringing activism to a new level.
  • Dow Chemical Company (also Union Carbide) –This wonderful companyhelped toreleased methyl isocyanate and other chemicals in 1984 by their pesticide plant in Bhopal, India, causing one of the worst industrial disasters in history. They are also one of thefive corporationscompletely dominating the seed market, making food sovereignty precarious for farmers and families around the world. Along with three other companies they also helped to create Dibromochloropropane (DBCP), a known carcinogen, reproductive toxin, and endocrine disruptor that contaminates ground water.They continued to produce and sell DBCP even after it was banned due to strong evidence linking the chemical to sterility.
  • Syngenta –Known forsuing Kaui’i Countywhen they wanted to keep herbicide and pesticide spraying away from their school children, homes and hospitals, and also for covering up thetrue toxicity of Atrazine. This company has also been implicated with colony collapse disorder, killing off our bees, and other important pollinators.

These defenders of genetically modified crops regularly claim that GM varieties of soy, corn, and other pestilence-inducing crops actually conserve soil because farmers don’t have to practice tilling in a way that causes erosion. They also lie that GMOs ‘conserve water.’ Well now, let’s look at those claims a little more closely, shall we?

The fact remains that GE varieties of seed have done absolutely nothing to minimize soil erosion or conserve water. Even major media publications are now coming back and apologizing about their original support of companies like Monsanto. Monsanto’s unsavory behavior even resulted in Forbes Magazine’s retraction of naming Monsanto “Company of the Year” in 2009, admitting they were “wrong on Monsanto… really wrong.”

GE scientists paid by Monsanto were also found to have committed fraud in India. ‘Experts’ from the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and the University of Agricultural Sciences (UAS) have been found guilty of infecting and subsequently hiding the fact that indigenously created Bt cotton contained a Monsanto gene.

These GE companies have secretly and stealthily planted poison crops all across our world, and our soil and water are being affected. Most alarming is the fact that GE crops affect soil fertility. In one gram of productive soil there is a complex web that can exceed over 100 million microorganisms that may represent over 1000 species. Monsanto and the biotech bullies are messing with those numbers.

GE crops DO NOT conserve water. In fact, as super weeds develop, GE crops inspire farmers to try to irrigate their desirable crops, as any grower would – only they end up watering the super weeds. Water – from ground water to well water to lakes, rivers, streams, and even oceans – is contaminated with copious amounts of pesticides and herbicides that are used to grow GE crops as well. This practice ruins the water that we do have on this planet, making it nearly impossible for farmers in water-poor countries to grow anything. GE crops are in fact one of the biggest sources of water pollution in the U.S. and elsewhere.

No matter how you slice it, the agricultural cake reeks of GM corruption and overt propaganda. GMO crops don’t save our water – they contaminate it. They don’t protect our soil – they kill off the millions of tiny organisms that account for soil health. GMOs are not necessary to feed the world, and they have no place in our food supply. No more GMO!

Source

Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden
The Spotted Lanternfly has Officially Arrived in the U.S.

The Spotted Lanternfly has Officially Arrived in the U.S.

The Spotted Lanternfly has Officially Arrived in the U.S.

The spotted lanternfly has officially arrived in the U.S., and leaders in Pennsylvania are hoping it won’t be staying long. The invasive pest poses a threat to fruit orchards and grape vines, along with forests and the timber industry. It was detected in Berks County, northwest of Philadelphia.

The Spotted Lanternfly has Officially Arrived in the U.S.

Image credit: Holly Raguza

“Berks County is the front line in the war against Spotted Lanternfly,” Agriculture Secretary George Greig said in a news release. “We are taking every measure possible to learn more, educate the public and ourselves and eliminate this threat to agriculture.”

The spotted lanternfly, or Lycorma delicatula, is native to parts of China and eastern Asia. It attacks trees by feeding on sap and harms them further by excreting large amounts of a fluid that coats leaves and stems and encourages the growth of mold, according to researchers.

Pennsylvania announced both the insect’s discovery and a quarantine to contain it in a bulletin Saturday, saying that in the U.S., the spotted lanternfly “has the potential to greatly impact the grape, fruit tree and logging industries.” The agriculture agency added that along with pines and stone fruit trees (such as peaches), the pest attacks “more than 70 additional species.”

When officials declared a quarantine for the Pike and District townships in Berks County, they also urged citizens to help look for both mature insects and egg clusters. Adult spotted lanternflies begin to lay their eggs around September; nymphs emerge in the spring.

The state explains what its action entails:

“The general quarantine of the two townships restricts movement of any material or object that can spread the pest. This includes firewood or wood products, brush or yard waste, remodeling or construction materials and waste, packing material like boxes, grapevines for decorative purposes or as nursery stock, and any outdoor household articles like lawnmowers, grills, tarps and any other equipment, trucks or vehicles not stored indoors.

“Businesses in the general quarantine area need to obtain a Certificate of Limited Permit from the department in order to move articles. Criminal and civil penalties of up to $20,000 and prison time can be imposed for violations by businesses or individuals.”

Greig said, “We know we’re asking a lot, but we know Pennsylvanians will assist us and help save our fruit trees, grapes and forests.”

A research paper about the bug’s spread in Korea explains why it can be tough to control:

“Furthermore, no natural enemy of L. delicatula seems to exist in Korea. Thus, farmers use pesticides to control them in vineyards (Park et al. 2009). However, the use of pesticides kills natural enemies of other grape pests and L. delicatula can repopulate pesticide-sprayed areas from nearby forested areas, which contain suitable host species.”

The study’s authors recommended using sticky traps at the base of trees that can host the insects.

Here are some of the plants the bug particularly likes, according to the researchers: Ailanthus altissima (tree of heaven), Evodia danielii (Korean evodia), Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper), Juglans mandshurica (Manchurian walnut) and Vitis vinifera (the common grapevine).

Source

Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden
Revolutionary Gardening: What Starts From a Seed?

Revolutionary Gardening: What Starts From a Seed?

Revolutionary Gardening: What Starts From a Seed?

By

There is freedom in a seed…

How do we move to a culture of self sufficiency and freedom? One seed, and one person at a time.

Revolutionary Gardening: What Starts From a Seed?We have to understand the earth we live in and the power over our lives that comes from food, energy, economy, etc. Moreover, there is great freedom in learning to step away from the grocery store, box stores and fast food, and reconnect with what we eat and how we live. It really only takes a few simple steps to things differently, though it takes lots of work to follow the path through.

Source – Truth Stream Media

“The ultimate wisdom which deals with beginnings, remains locked in a seed. There it lies, the simplest fact of the universe and at the same time the one which calls faith rather than reason.”
― Hal Borland

“Though I do not believe that a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders.”
― Henry David Thoreau

Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden
82 Sustainable Gardening Tips

82 Sustainable Gardening Tips

82 Sustainable Gardening Tips

By MOTHER EARTH NEWS readers and Shelley Stonebrook

Most gardeners have sustainability on their minds. After all, growing your own food is a huge step toward leading a sustainable lifestyle. Organic, chemical-free methods are inherently more sustainable — for human health, wildlife, the soil and the water supply — than non-organic techniques. But sustainable gardening goes beyond just using organic methods. From water and energy conservation to waste reduction and smart seed-sourcing, there are infinite ways we can make our practices more sustainable.

82 Sustainable Gardening Tips

Image credit: By Lamiot (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

To find out what’s going on in sustainable gardens across the United States and Canada, we surveyed the thousands of members of MOTHER’s Garden Advisory Group. Here are their best tips, broken down by category, many of which will not only help you garden more sustainably, but will save you money, too! We hope you’ll try these creative ideas in your garden and pass the tips along to your friends and neighbors. (To contribute tips to future articles, join our Editorial Advisory Groups.)
Reusing and Recycling Materials in the Garden

1. I use an old plastic mesh bag to round up leftover slivers of soap. I rubber-band the bag so it’s tight and hang it next to the hose. The combo of the slightly abrasive bag and the soap scrubs off garden dirt. — Irene, Washington

2. I make row covers out of tomato cages, old rebar I got free, and used blankets I got at the local thrift store. — Cathy, Florida

3. Instead of purchasing expensive weed-blocking landscape cloth, I use free old tarps from my local lumber store that they used to cover wood during shipping. — David, Utah

4. I gather pieces of concrete to use as stepping stones in my garden. — Susan, Virginia

5. I recycle drink cups to grow tomatoes from seed. When they’re ready to transplant, I simply remove the bottom inch or so of each cup and plant directly in the ground. This prevents cutworms from making a meal of my transplants. — S., California

6. I was given some heavy-duty metal “for sale” sign frames, and I placed them in my raised beds to support bed covers in early spring. — Kat, California

7. Old pantyhose are my friends: They make garden ties, and I use them to “bag” cantaloupes growing on trellises so the melons have extra support. — Donna, North Carolina

8. I make all my garden fencing with scrap wood and build my veggie trellises and arbors with fallen branches and saplings. — Irene, New Jersey

9. My plant tags are twigs with a shaved-off area to write on. — Michelle, New York

10. For a cold frame in late winter, we prop old windows against straw bales. When I know we’re in danger of a frost, I take old bean poles and jab them into the ends of my beds, throw old sheets over them, use stones or bricks to hold down the edges, and voilà! I have a makeshift tent in my garden. — Liz, Ohio

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Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden
Colorado’s First Legal Hemp Harvest Since 1957

Colorado’s First Legal Hemp Harvest Since 1957

Colorado’s First Legal Hemp Harvest Since 1957

By Nelson Harvey

Colorado’s First Legal Hemp Harvest Since 1957Boosters of industrial hemp often fondly refer to the plant as a wonder crop, usable in everything from building materials to batteries to breakfast cereal. Since Colorado voters legalized both hemp and marijuana with the passage of Amendment 64 in 2012, hemp advocates have been buzzing about the state’s promise as a manufacturing hub for this dizzying array of products. Yet even as Colorado farmers make history this fall with the first legal commercial hemp harvest on U.S. soil in 57 years, it’s unlikely that much of their bounty will go toward the plant’s diverse list of potential uses.

Instead, hobbled by a longstanding federal ban on shipping hemp seed across state lines, most Colorado hemp farmers are squirreling away their seed supply, using this year’s harvest as a source of next year’s supply in an attempt to vastly increase planted acreage in 2015 with Colorado-grown seed stock.

“In an ideal world we’d grow between 1,500 and 2,000 acres of hemp next year, said J.R. Knaub, a 37-year-old farmer in the northeastern Colorado town of Sterling who has been growing corn, sugar beets and alfalfa for the last 20 years and this year planted around 2 acres of hemp. “But getting seed will be the biggest task we have to conquer.”

The federally-induced seed shortage has already stunted the growth of Colorado’s hemp industry: Last spring, farmers registered with the Colorado Department of Agriculture to plant nearly 1,600 acres of hemp. Yet seed shortages, poor germination rates and inexperience with the crop will limit their harvest this fall to about 200 acres, according to Zev Paiss of the Rocky Mountain Hemp Association.

“This year, because it was so hard to get seed, people were buying whatever they could get a hold of, and it wasn’t always the best seed,” said Paiss. “Because of that, I’ve heard that the amount of germination farmers achieved varied widely.”

In light of the shortage, Colorado hemp farmers appear to be prioritizing seed saving this fall over other potential uses for their hemp crops. The state Department of Agriculture requires hemp farmers to submit a form at least 30 days before harvest detailing what they plan to do with their plants, and as of late September, 27 farmers had written that they plan to use their crop primarily for seed saving purposes. Just 14 farmers had plans to experiment with making construction materials, textiles, medicines and other hemp-based products, and only one farmer planned to sell seed to other growers this fall. (As this story was published, “harvest notification” forms continued to roll in from farmers around the state).

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Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden
Crop Rotation in the Home Garden

Crop Rotation in the Home Garden

Crop Rotation in the Home Garden

By

Overview
Crop rotation is the practice of growing different crops, on the same land, in sequential planting cycles ranging from 2 to 8 years. Farmers have used crop rotation for centuries as a means of reducing crop lose due to disease and insects, as well as replacing essential nutrients, used by plants while growing, back into the soil. It was first mentioned in early Roman literature, and George Washington Carver is widely credited with introducing crop rotation to the United States by rotating peanuts, sweet potatoes, and cotton.

Crop Rotation in the Home GardenInsects and Disease
Soil borne pathogens, and insects, that attack one member of a plant family frequently will infect or attack other plants in that same family. Planting similar plants in the same location, year after year, tends to make the soil in that location much more prone to the diseases and insects that harm those plants.

Soil Nutrients
Different crops take varying amounts of different nutrients from the soil as they grow and produce fruit or vegetables. If similar plants continue to be planted in the same location year after year, the nutrients in the soil inevitably become unbalanced to the point where even the addition of fertilizers may not entirely correct the deficiency.

Preferred Method
There is no hard and fast rule as to which plants should be planted after another when practicing crop rotation, whether in the farmer’s fields or in the home garden. The most effective, and easiest crop rotation system involves grouping vegetables into six ( 6 ) different groups, each of these groups having similar insect, disease, and soil nutritional content characteristics. Never plant a vegetable from the same group, in the same location, two years in a row. Waiting three years before planting a vegetable from the same group is even better.

For example, if this spring you plant Tomatoes, a Group III plant, in a particular spot in the garden, you could plant Broccoli, a Group II plant, in that same spot this fall, and then Cantaloupe, a Group I plant, in that spot next spring. By sequentially planting warm and cool season crops from different groups, you will maximize your garden’s production while maintaining good crop rotation practices.

Here is a Garden Planning spreadsheet that I use with my raised beds utilizing “square foot gardening”, to help keep track of what has been planted, where it was planted, and when. Use it as it is, or feel free to modify it to better meet your particular needs.

Conclusion
Although it takes a little advance planning to implement crop rotation in your home garden, the increased health and production of your vegetables will make you glad to put the effort into doing so.

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Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden
Missouri’s ‘Right to Farm’ Amendment Faces Court Challenge

Missouri’s ‘Right to Farm’ Amendment Faces Court Challenge

Missouri’s ‘Right to Farm’ Amendment Faces Court Challenge

by

A constitutional amendment creating a right to farm that was passed by Missouri voters in August faces a legal challenge filed Tuesday by opponents.

Missouri's 'Right to Farm' AmendmentOpponents have asked the state Supreme Court to overturn the election results, contending the ballot summary voters saw was misleading and inaccurate, the Associated Press reports.

The amendment, which passed by 2,375 vots out of nearly 1 million total cast, makes Missouri the second state, besides North Dakota, to place farming rights in its constitution.

The challenge contends that the ballot summary was misleading because it could apply to any farmer or rancher, including a foreign-owned corporation, and isn’t limited to Missouri citizens.

Source

Video: Missouri battles over amendment granting ‘right to farm’

Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden
GMOs, Gene Patenting, and the Corporatization

GMOs, Gene Patenting, and the Corporatization

“The Future of Food” – GMOs, Gene Patenting, and the Corporatization of Our Food Supply

By Dr. Mercola

The GMO food labeling movement has gained momentum over the past several years, passing labeling laws in three states. America’s awareness of the risks of genetically engineered (GE) foods and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to their health and the environment continues to expand.

GMOs, Gene Patenting, and the Corporatization

Sunset papaya cultivar, which was genetically modified to create the SunUp cultivar, resistant to PRSV

The Future of Food is not a new film, but still does an excellent job of covering contemporary issues that continue to threaten your health, including genetic engineering, gene patenting, and the corporatization of the food supply.

The film has received multiple awards, including Best Documentary at the dead CENTER Film Festival in 2004, as well as an Oscar nomination for the same.1 Of special importance to me, it was the movie that catalyzed my interest in the GMO problem and after watching it, I committed to doing everything I could to stop this danger.

I recently had the opportunity to interview Deborah Garcia about her new film Symphony of the Soil when I was lecturing in Santa Rosa California at the Heirloom Seed Conference.

The US has no laws requiring the labeling of GE foods, yet polls consistently show that the overwhelming majority of Americans—over 90 percent in most polls—believe these foods should be labeled. Sixty-four countries already require the labeling of GE foods, including European Union states, Japan, and China.2

More than 80 percent of all processed foods sold in the US now contain GE ingredients. With elections around the corner and labeling initiatives making the ballot in two states, it’s important to know what’s at stake.

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Posted by Red Pill Reports in Home, Farm & Garden