ISS

Solar Arrays on the International Space Station

Solar Arrays on the International Space Station

Solar Arrays on the International Space Station

Solar Arrays on the International Space Station

Image credit: ESA/NASA

Expedition 43 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) photographed the giant solar arrays on the International Space Station on Feb. 12, 2015.

The space station’s solar arrays contain a total of 262,400 solar cells and cover an area of about 27,000 square feet (2,500 square meters) — more than half the area of a football field. A solar array’s wingspan of 240 feet (73 meters) is longer than a Boeing 777’s wingspan, which is 212 feet (65 meters). Altogether, the four sets of arrays can generate 84 to 120 kilowatts of electricity — enough to provide power to more than 40 homes. The solar arrays produce more power than the station needs at one time for station systems and experiments. When the station is in sunlight, about 60 percent of the electricity that the solar arrays generate is used to charge the station’s batteries. At times, some or all of the solar arrays are in the shadow of Earth or the shadow of part of the station. This means that those arrays are not collecting sunlight. The batteries power the station when it is not in the sun.

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Posted by Red Pill Reports in Space
Solar Eclipse From the International Space Station

Solar Eclipse From the International Space Station

Solar Eclipse From the International Space Station

Solar Eclipse From the International Space Station

Image credit: ESA/NASA

Expedition 43 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti took a series of photographs of the March 20, 2015 solar eclipse from the International Space Station. Cristoforetti wrote, “Orbital sunrise and the #SolarEclipse… could it go any better?”

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between Earth and the sun, casting a shadow over Earth. The moon’s shadow masks the solar surface and blocks sunlight from reaching Earth directly – but the amount of sunlight blocked depends on location.

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Video: Solar eclipse 20/3-2015 – Timelapse video of Tórshavn

This timelapse video shows the two minutes of darkness caused by the total solar eclipse in Tórshavn, Faroe Islands on 20/3-2015.

Video: Solar Eclipse 2015 In One Minute

Time-lapse footage shows the full spectacle of the eclipse, as over two-and-a-half hours of filming is condensed into just sixty seconds.

Video: Extremely Rare:Super Moon Solar Eclipse on Spring Equinox,March 20,2015

Rare Phenomenon Of Supermoon Total Solar Eclipse Coming Up On March 20 In Britain; Power Disruption Expected.The total solar eclipse of March 20 will also coincide with the Spring Equinox. This rare event will only occur three more times this century – in 2034, 2053 and 2072 – and not at all in the next. Further, the moon on the night of the 19th will be a supermoon, when it is at the closest point in its orbit to the earth.

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Expedition 42 Returns to Earth

Expedition 42 Returns to Earth

Expedition 42 Returns to Earth

Expedition 42 Returns to Earth

Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

The Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is seen as it lands with International Space Station Expedition 42 commander Barry Wilmore of NASA, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan. The landing took place on the evening of Wednesday, March 11 in the U.S, and early in the morning on Thursday, March 12, in Kazakhstan.

The three crew members returned to Earth after a 167-day mission on the orbital outpost that included hundreds of scientific experiments and several spacewalks to prepare the orbiting laboratory for future arrivals by U.S. commercial crew spacecraft.

Source

Video: Astronauts emerge from Soyuz after six months on ISS

Extracted from the capsule, which was charred on re-entry, the three were seated in semi-reclined chairs for a breath of fresh air and first medical checks, bundled up in blankets to protect them from frigid temperatures.

‘Everything is great, thank you. The guys are great and worked very well,’ said a smiling Serova while a female doctor measured her pulse and blood pressure.

‘Congratulations on the recent holiday,’ a rescue and recovery team officer said to Serova, referring to the International Women’s Day marked on 8 March.

‘Everything is fine. I am drinking real tea with lemon,’ Samokutyaev said with a smile.

‘I am glad to be here,’ Wilmore said in Russian before the three got into all-terrain vehicles and were taken to individual helicopters to be evacuated from the landing area.

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Expedition 42

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Island of Hawaii From the International Space Station

Island of Hawaii From the International Space Station

Island of Hawaii From the International Space Station

Island of Hawaii From the International Space Station

Image credit: NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti

From the International Space Station, European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti (@AstroSamantha) took this photograph of the island of Hawaii and posted it to social media on Feb. 28, 2015. Cristoforetti wrote, “And suddenly as we flew over the Pacific… the island of #Hawaii with its volcanoes! #HelloEarth”

Crewmembers on the space station photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface as part of the Crew Earth Observations program. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions. Astronauts have used hand-held cameras to photograph the Earth for more than 40 years, beginning with the Mercury missions in the early 1960s. The ISS maintains an altitude between 220 – 286 miles (354 – 460 km) above the Earth, and an orbital inclination of 51.6˚, providing an excellent stage for observing most populated areas of the world.

Video: International Space Station Fly-over: Honolulu, Hawaii – Thursday, July 29, 2010

This is the I.S.S., flying over my home city of Honolulu on the Island of Oahu, State of Hawaii. It rose from the area of the Ala Wai Yacht Harbor, and headed for the Manoa Valley.

Posted by Red Pill Reports in Space
Chicago in Winter

Chicago in Winter

Chicago in Winter

Chicago in Winter

Image credit: NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti

From the International Space Station (ISS), European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this photograph of Chicago and posted it to social media on Feb. 19, 2015. She wrote, “How do you like #Chicago dressed for winter?”

Crew members on the space station photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface as part of the Crew Earth Observations program. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions. Astronauts have used hand-held cameras to photograph the Earth for more than 40 years, beginning with the Mercury missions in the early 1960s. The ISS maintains an altitude between 220 – 286 miles (354 – 460 km) above the Earth, and an orbital inclination of 51.6˚, providing an excellent stage for observing most populated areas of the world.

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Posted by Red Pill Reports in Space
Astronaut Barry Wilmore on the First of Three Spacewalks

Astronaut Barry Wilmore on the First of Three Spacewalks

Astronaut Barry Wilmore on the First of Three Spacewalks

Astronaut Barry Wilmore on the First of Three Spacewalks

Image credit: NASA

NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore works outside the International Space Station on the first of three spacewalks preparing the station for future arrivals by U.S. commercial crew spacecraft, Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015. Fellow spacewalker Terry Virts, seen reflected in the visor, shared this photograph on social media.

The spacewalks are designed to lay cables along the forward end of the U.S. segment to bring power and communication to two International Docking Adapters slated to arrive later this year. The new docking ports will welcome U.S. commercial spacecraft launching from Florida beginning in 2017, permitting the standard station crew size to grow from six to seven and potentially double the amount of crew time devoted to research.

The second and third spacewalks are planned for Wednesday, Feb. 25 and Sunday, March 1, with Wilmore and Virts participating in all three.

Source

Video: NASA Spacewalk of Terry Virts and Barry Wilmore

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Space Station Flyover of Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa

Space Station Flyover of Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa

Space Station Flyover of Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa

Space Station Flyover of Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa

Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa. Image credit: NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti

European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this photograph from the International Space Station and posted it to social media on Jan. 30, 2015. Cristoforetti wrote, “A spectacular flyover of the Gulf of Aden and the Horn of Africa. #HelloEarth”

Video: ISS Timelapse – From Alps to Gulf of Aden (CAM2) (07 Gennaio 2015)

Expedition 42 crew made a couple of sequence with two different cameras of the same pass.
Other video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QALfQxiRLhI
© All images are courtesy of http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/

Wikipedia

The Gulf of Aden is a gulf located in the Arabian Sea between Yemen, on the south coast of the Arabian Peninsula, and Somalia in the Horn of Africa. In the northwest, it connects with the Red Sea through the Bab-el-Mandeb strait, which is about 20 miles wide. It shares its name with the port city of Aden in Yemen, which forms the northern shore of the gulf. Historically the Gulf of Aden was known as “The Gulf of Berbera”, named after the ancient Somali port city of Berbera on the south side of the gulf. However as the city of Aden grew during the colonial era, the name of “Gulf of Aden” was popularised.

The waterway is part of the important Suez canal shipping route between the Mediterranean Sea and the Arabian Sea in the Indian Ocean with 21,000 ships crossing the gulf annually.

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Super View of Glendale and Phoenix

Super View of Glendale and Phoenix

Super View of Glendale and Phoenix

View of Glendale and Phoenix from ISS

Image credit: NASA

View of Glendale and Phoenix from ISS

One of the Expedition 35 crew members on the International Space Station used a still camera with a 400 millimeter lens to record this nocturnal image of the Phoenix, Arizona area on March 16, 2013. Like many large urban areas of the central and western United States, the Phoenix metropolitan area is laid out along a regular grid of city blocks and streets. While visible during the day, this grid is most evident at night, when the pattern of street lighting is clearly visible from above — in the case of this photograph, from the low Earth orbit vantage point of the International Space Station.

The urban grid form encourages growth of a city outwards along its borders, by providing optimal access to new real estate. Fueled by the adoption of widespread personal automobile use during the 20th century, the Phoenix metropolitan area today includes 25 other municipalities (many of them largely suburban and residential in character) linked by a network of surface streets and freeways.

The image area includes parts of several cities in the metropolitan area including Phoenix proper (right), Glendale (center), and Peoria (left). While the major street grid is oriented north-south, the northwest-southeast oriented Grand Avenue cuts across it at image center. Grand Avenue is a major transportation corridor through the western metropolitan area; the lighting patterns of large industrial and commercial properties are visible along its length. Other brightly lit properties include large shopping centers, strip centers, and gas stations which tend to be located at the intersections of north-south and east-west trending streets. While much of the land area highlighted in this image is urbanized, there are several noticeably dark areas. The Phoenix Mountains at upper right are largely public park and recreational land.

To the west (image lower left), agricultural fields provide a sharp contrast to the lit streets of neighboring residential developments. The Salt River channel appears as a dark ribbon within the urban grid at lower right.

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Rocky Mountain National Park Viewed From ISS

Rocky Mountain National Park Viewed From ISS

Rocky Mountain National Park Viewed From ISS

Rocky Mountain National Park Viewed From ISS

Rocky Mountain National Park Viewed From ISS. Image Credit: NASA/Terry Virts

Rocky Mountain National Park Viewed From the International Space Station. Marking the 100th anniversary of the Rocky Mountain National Park on Jan. 26, 2015, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry Virts posted this photograph, taken from the International Space Station, to Twitter. Virts wrote, “Majestic peaks and trails! Happy 100th anniversary @RockyNPS So much beauty to behold in our @NatlParkService.” Image Credit: NASA/Terry Virts

Video: Timelapse: Earth from International Space Station

December 22, 2014 7:53 AM EST – Using footage from 12,500 images captured during his six-month stay aboard the International Space Station, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst created a six-minute timelapse of the view of Earth. (European Space Agency)

Live video from the International Space Station: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-iss-stream

Live video from the International Space Station includes internal views when the crew is on-duty and Earth views at other times. The video is accompanied by audio of conversations between the crew and Mission Control. This video is only available when the space station is in contact with the ground. During “loss of signal” periods, viewers will see a blue screen. Since the station orbits the Earth once every 90 minutes, it experiences a sunrise or a sunset about every 45 minutes. When the station is in darkness, external camera video may appear black, but can sometimes provide spectacular views of lightning or city lights below.

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