Truce

The Christmas Truce of 1914 – Pinhole of Light Among a Nightmare of Madness

The Christmas Truce of 1914 – Pinhole of Light Among a Nightmare of Madness

The Christmas Truce of 1914 – Pinhole of Light Among a Nightmare of Madness

By Tony Cartalucci | Land Destroyer

The Christmas Truce of 1914

December 24, 2014 (Tony Cartalucci – LD) In the end, we have more in common with the furthest flung foreign common man than the closest corporate-fascist that presumes dominion over our lives.

During the early 1900’s, Europe was locked in the first World War. Millions would perish – tens of thousands in a single day. On one brief occasion, a pinhole of light shined through this utter madness, revealing the truth of this man-made nightmare. The men in the trenches were being driven toward each other, not by some irreconcilable difference they had with one another, but by the greed of those ruling elite residing in their respective homelands.

If only the British and Germans realized it was the greed of their own banking houses and industrialists that had them in the trenches and not some irreconcilable difference amongst themselves…

Knowledge is power, ignorance literally can mean death. When will we start being leaders in our homes, communities, counties, and provinces – driving our own destiny rather than being driven? Shall we look upon the Christmas Truce of 1914 with wonder a century on, or look toward it as evidence something was and still is tragically wrong with human civilization and work this next year with renewed vigor to resolve it?

Source

Wikipedia

The Christmas truce (German: Weihnachtsfrieden; French: Trêve de Noël) was a series of widespread but unofficial ceasefires along the Western Front around Christmas 1914. In the week leading up to the holiday, German and British soldiers crossed trenches to exchange seasonal greetings and talk. In areas, men from both sides ventured into no man’s land on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day to mingle and exchange food and souvenirs. There were joint burial ceremonies and prisoner swaps, while several meetings ended in carol-singing. Men played games of football with one another, giving one of the most enduring images of the truce. However, the peaceful behaviour was not ubiquitous; fighting continued in some sectors, while in others the sides settled on little more than arrangements to recover bodies. The following year, a few units arranged ceasefires, but the truces were not nearly as widespread as in 1914; this was, in part, due to strongly worded orders from the high commands of both sides prohibiting fraternisation

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